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June 21, 2021
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OSC Warrant Officer Training
Nov 02, 2021 - Nov 05, 2021
Chicago, IL

OSC Warrant Officer Training provides an overview of the contracting and program authorities vested in a warranted OSC. It will explain the various tools, procurement and non-procurement that are available to an OSC during emergency and time-critical removal actions. It also gives a good overview of government contracting principles and vulnerabilities. There will be case study preparation and presentation and a test given on the final day.

By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Understand the responsibilities and authorities delegated to OSCs when directing emergency response and removal actions. This course reviews the response and contracting authorities delegated to the OSC under the National Oil and Hazard Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).
  • Learn about the fundamentals of contracting. The course provides basic information on key contracting elements and effective contract management practices
  • Understand the contracting tools and techniques authorized for use under the OSC’s Delegated Procurement Authority (DPA). The course provides OSCs with the policies and procedures for procurement tools under the DPA and other mechanisms that are available to access and use during a response.
  • Learn how to apply the tools and techniques in a removal action scenario. The course includes a response case study to provide participants an opportunity to apply the skills learned during the training.

This course is designed for personnel who are experienced and pre-designated as OSCs capable of being assigned emergency response or other field assignments where they may be required to make independent time-critical or emergency decisions. EPA project officers and contracting officers supporting the removal and emergency response program also may benefit from attending the training. This course is only open to EPA personnel.

Before taking the OSC Warrant Officer Training, the EPA OSC must be a certified COR. Becoming a certified COR is a mandatory requirement for an EPA OSC to request the warrant after taking the OSC Warrant Officer Training. Online courses are available at http://oamintra.epa.gov/node/drupal/?q=node/33 to become a COR. The online course must be completed at least 7 business days before attending the OSC Warrant Officer Training. A copy of the COR guidelines is available at http://www.fai.gov/drupal/certification/fac-cor-certification-requirements

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*

Daily Class Times:
Tuesday - 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Wednesday - 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Thursday - 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM
Friday - 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

More information and registration

 

Monthly Engineering Forum Virtual Training
Nov 03, 2021 - Nov 03, 2021
Live Online Class, Internet Based

The Engineering Forum (EF), established in the late 1980s, is a group of engineers and scientists that supports the Superfund and RCRA programs in each of the ten EPA Regional Offices. As one of the EPA Technical Support Project’s (TSP) three technical forums, the EF is a medium for exchanging technical information regarding innovative site cleanup and characterization technologies. Monthly technical talks focus on site-specific engineering problems encountered, alternatives and solutions, and lessons learned. After each presentation, information regarding upcoming events and training are discussed and time for an Open Mic discussion is provided. If you are a Superfund, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Brownfields, state or federal environmental professional who is interested in solving technical issues, register for any technical talks listed below that interest you and join the discussion!

Presentations are specifically designed for EPA staff including RPMs, OSCs, Corrective Action Managers, Superfund and Technology Liaisons, Chemists, Biologists, Physical Scientists, and Engineers from within EPA regions, program offices, laboratory system, and headquarters personnel as well as environmental professionals from state agencies, tribes, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Dept. of Energy, and other federal agencies of all experience levels. THIS TRAINING IS NOT OPEN TO ACADEMIA, CONTRACTORS, CONSULTANTS OR OTHER PRIVATE ENTITIES.

We will try to meet any special accommodations necessary for our participants as possible if given a minumum of two weeks notice. You will be prompted to indicate if you need any special accommocations upon registering for these events.

*This training is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend. One CLP will be issued for each session attended when you register and log on with the registration link provided to enable your attendance to be confirmed.*
 

The Central Treatment Plant (CTP) was inherited by EPA in 1995 through a series of bankruptcies and ownership changes of the Bunker Hill Smelter Complex and the famous Bunker Hill Mine within the epicenter of the Bunker Hill Superfund Site. The CTP, was originally constructed in 1974 by the Bunker Hill Company to treat smelter complex industrial waste waters and acid mine drainage flows from the Bunker Hill Mine. Until 2017, the plant’s original equipment remained and was relied upon, with the exception of the installation of new conveyance lines and a lined storage pond constructed in 1994 and 1999, new lime silos, a new lime feed system and the addition of a control tower along with computer operator workstations in 2005. Meanwhile the nearby Bunker Hill mine remained under private ownership and continued to produce 1400 or greater GPM of acid mine drainage (AMD) that continued to need to be treated. Flows would increase substantially, sometimes double, during spring freshet and the pH would drop to corrosive levels.

Recently EPA has constructed a new treatment system to replace the worn out aeration basin, polymer injection system, lime feed system, new System Control and Data Acquisition system, and multi-media sand filtration. The work included the construction of a groundwater collection system and the entire system was constructed under an Operate/Design/Build/Operate contract administered by the Corps of Engineers. Continued operations were critical to the implementation of this project as the AMD from the Bunker Hill Mine needed to be treated before, during, and after the CTP upgrades were being constructed. The project is now in its final months of shakedown testing prior to operations shifting to the State of Idaho.

This presentation will provide an overview of the new groundwater collection system and CTP and the influent sources along with some of the technical challenges that have been encountered.

More information and registration

 

Best Practices for Site Characterization Throughout the Remediation Process
Nov 16, 2021 - Nov 18, 2021
Chicago, IL

Best Practices for Site Characterization Throughout the Remediation Process is based on best management practices (BMP) implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), partnership organizations, federal and state partners, and consultants. Participants will learn how to streamline projects in a legal, technically sound, and cost-effective manner. By taking the course, participants achieve the following objectives:

  • Integrate best practices into traditional project activities. This course illustrates how to use more effective sampling plan design, data collection, analysis, and management strategies at various entry points in a typical project time-line. The course highlights emerging quality assurance and quality control methods for evaluating data sufficiency and optimizing project sequencing. Case studies highlight benefits of using best practices at hazardous waste sites.
  • Effectively collect and communicate critical project information. The course stresses the use of the systematic planning process to involve key stakeholders and develop the conceptual site model (CSM). The course provides examples of CSMs and describes how they are used as the basis for project and sampling plan design, and as a tool for maintaining stakeholder consensus throughout the project life cycle. Participants will be shown how comprehensive systematic planning extends beyond normal data quality models. The course examines tools for managing the uncertainties associated with sampling, social, economic, and political factors that significantly impact hazardous waste cleanup and reuse projects.
  • Design dynamic work strategies. Systematic planning provides the foundation for designing effective dynamic work strategies (DWS). The course describes the components of a DWS, including (1) methods for verifying performance, (2) using collaborative data sets, (3) methods for real-time decision making, (4) managing sample and small-scale variability, (5) designing project and field decision logic, (6) implementing contingencies, and (7) creating streamlined work plans.
  • Recognize and overcome the challenges presented while implementing a dynamic work strategy. Controlling a project during a DWS is challenging and involves communication and planning. Participants will learn how to manage and adjust programs in the field while maintaining the project’s integrity. The course describes methods for controlling and directing work during dynamic work efforts, which include using unitized costing, setting project ceilings, and lowering project costs. Participants will examine how more focused characterization efforts can extend project funds and maximize the data collected.
  • Use BMPs to support all phases of the environmental cleanup life cycle. In addition to supporting site characterization, site characterization and remediation BMPs can directly support risk assessment, technology selection, remedial design, remedy implementation, long-term operations, and optimization efforts. The course describes specific ways practitioners can apply the BMPs to support these major project phases.

Course Outline

  1. Overview of Best Practices for Site Characterization and Remediation
  2. Systematic Project Planning
  3. Developing Dynamic Work Strategies
  4. Implementing a Dynamic Field Investigation
  5. Risk Assessment and Real-Time Data
  6. Best Practices for Remedy Design and Implementation

Daily Class Times:
Tuesday - 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Wedbesday - 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Thursday - 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM

More information and registration

 

RPM 201
Nov 30, 2021 - Dec 02, 2021
Dallas, TX

RPM 201, an intermediate-level training course, expands on the Remedial Process course. The course is offered as part of the ongoing effort to prepare RPMs for the challenges they will encounter during all aspects of a remedial action. The instructional methodology will include case studies to provide participants an opportunity to apply the skills learned during the course. The course will also include time for participants to ask specific questions about their own sites they currently are working on, as well as emerging technical and programmatic policy and guidance from EPA Headquarters. By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:

  • Learn how to manage common issues or concepts at remedial action sites, such as vapor intrusion, sediment removal, contaminated groundwater plumes and green remediation.
  • Learn project management skills, including management of a project, forecasting resources and costs, planning meetings, documenting site activities and tracking schedules and costs.
  • Learn effective ways to communicate various types of issues at sites to residents and communities.
  • Learn how to incorporate optimization into new and existing remedial actions.

RPM 201 is a 2-½-day training recommended for RPMs with at least six months of experience and may have assisted other RPMs with remedial actions or now are preparing to take the lead in conducting a remedial action. While RPM 201 may be most beneficial to new RPMs with 5 years of experience or less, the course is very interactive and more experienced RPMs that attend will be encouraged to share their field background with the class. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO ACADEMIA, CONSULTANTS, CONTRACTORS OR ANY PRIVATE ENTITIES. Superfund 101 and the Remedial Process course are prerequisites for EPA attendees to participate in RPM 201.

*This course is offered free of charge to all registrants who are confirmed to attend.*

Daily Class Times: 
Tuesday - 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Wednesday - 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Thursday - 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM

More information and registration

 

 

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